Drypoint Animals

Swiss Grazers Series:
Oct. 2016, Nontoxic Drypoint Monoprint with Chine Colle, Series of 8, Approximately 5 x 4 inches on Arches 88
Troublemakers Series:
Oct. 2016, Nontoxic Drypoint Monoprint with Chine Colle, Series of 8, Approximately 10 x 8 inches on Arches 88
Two Quackers Series:
Oct. 2016, Nontoxic Drypoint Monoprint with Chine Colle, Series of 6, on Arches 88
 Harry & Rosy Series:
Sept. 2015, Series of 6, Nontoxic Drypoint Monoprint Variants
Wine Labels Project:
Three sets of wine labels based on the saying, “When you drink you are either a sleepy lamb, a angry lion, or a silly monkey.”
To see the other two sets see Wine Label Series
All illustrations intended to float on a transparent label.  Sheep for red wine, lion for rose wine, and monkey for white wine.
Assortment of Cows & Sheep (2014-2016):
Assorted Animal Drypoint Prints, 2014-Present:
Assortment of Photos from Solo Senior Shows & Displays (2015- 2016):
I created a zoo of animals, and then my zoo became a farm. The prints shown
are but a handful of animals that have been imagined and created in the quiet
printmaking studio on the 4th floor of my university.
Animals have been my muses for quite sometime. Their fur, feathers, and wool
provide wonderful texture, but it’s their personalities that shine through. I see
printmaking as a chance to create different stories through the smallest shifts of color
and imagery. Through the possibilities of multiples I create variations where I
experiment with different colors, layering images, and pushing a more for moody or
whimsical atmosphere.
M. Victoria Savka 19th of December 2016
Drypoint printmaking is a subtractive process, where a sharp, needle-like tool
scratches into a plate to form an image. It can be seen as a form of etching where no
chemical is used, thus it has been named ‘dry–point’. Traditionally printmakers use
copper plates, but currently many use laminated cardboard, zinc, and plexi-glas to
create their images. I use an exact-o knife for my prints, crosshatching the patterns and
images into the plates.
*The R.I.T. printmaking community prides itself for being taught by Mr. Keith
Howard. He was the first printmaker who systematically investigated alternative
processes in intaglio printmaking in order to substitute hazardous chemicals used in
traditional printmaking processes. His innovated thoughts and research have brought
new possibilities to printmakers worldwide.